Bromhexine

Dose | Side Effect | Syrup

Bromhexine is a drug from the group of medicines called expectorants. Expectorants help you cough up the phlegm. Since phlegm occurs only if you have productive cough, this medication should be used only to treat productive cough and should not be used to treat dry cough. Bromhexine is a synthetic substance obtained as a synthetic analog of vasicine - a substance found in plant called Adhtoda vasica. The mechanism of action is based on phlegm degradation whic ease your cough.

Precautions

Bromhexine should be avoided in patients allergic to this medicine. Symptoms of an allergy include:

  1. skin rash,
  2. itching,
  3. swelling of the face,
  4. swelling of the tongue,
  5. difficulty breathing.

Tell your doctor if you are experiencing any of above-mentioned symptoms.

Consult your doctor if you notice any skin changes. Bromhexine can cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (although very rarely). This syndrome is a life-threatening skin disorder and is manifested with the appearance of red maculae on the skin. After a while, on these red maculae appear blisters, which then burst and leave sores. Maculae usually occurs on the face first, and then spread to the chest and other body parts.

Bromhexine may cause the damage of the stomach, and therefore should be avoided in patients with stomach and duodenal ulcers.

Patients with liver or kidney disorders should avoid use of Bromhexine syrup, tablets or inhaler, unless recommended by doctor.

Use of Bromhexine during pregnancy and breastfeeding

Bromhexine should be used during pregnancy only if the benefit to the mother outweighs the risk to the fetus. Animal studies have shown adverse effects of Bromhexine inhaler, syrup and tablets on the unborn baby. It should not be used during the first three months of pregnancy unless recommended by doctor.

Bromhexine passes into breast milk. Avoid breastfeeding while using this medicine.

Bromhexine dose

Bromhexine is found in the form of syrup, inhaler and tablets. It should not be used for more than 5 days, unless recommended by doctor. Syrup usually comes with a spoon, which will help you to measure the required dose. If you do not get the spoon, you can use a teaspoon (5 ml) or a tablespoon (10 ml).

Dosage

Bromhexine 2 mg / ml syrup:

Patients above the age of 14 4-8 ml every 8 hours (three times a day)
Children aged 6-14 years 4 ml every 8 hours (three times a day)
Children aged 2-6 years 2.5 ml, every 8 hours (three times a day)

Bromhexine 4 mg / 5 ml syrup:

Patients above the age of 14 10ml-20ml, three times a day (every 8 hours)
Children aged 6 -14 years 10 ml three times a day (every 8 hours)
Children aged 2 - 6 years 5 ml three times a day (every 8 hours)

Bromhexine inhalation:

Adults 4 ml, every 12 hours (twice a day)
Patients above the age of 14 2 ml to every 12 hours (twice a day)
Children aged 6-14 years 1 ml every 12 hours (twice a day)
Children aged 2-6 years 10 drops, every 12 hours (twice a day)

Bromhexine tablets:

Patients above the age of 14 8-16 mg, three times a day (every 8 hours)
Children aged 6 - 14 years Bromhexine 8 mg, three times a day (every 8 hours)

Bromhexine tablets need to be taken with at least 250 ml of water. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not chew or crush the tablet, as this may affect Bromhexine effect. Pills need to be taken after a meal, in order to minimize the damage to the stomach mucous membrane.

Use with other medicines (Interactions)

Tell your doctor about all medications and herbal medicines you are taking to treat cough, because concomitant use of Bromhexine syrup, inhalations or tablets with other cough medicines can lead to the accumulation of mucous in the lungs.

Bromhexine side effects

Bromhexine may cause the following side effects:

  • bronchial narrowing (bronchospasm),
  • difficulty breathing,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • diarrhea,
  • abdominal pain,
  • fever,
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome (a life-threatening skin disorder),
  • and allergy.

Tell your doctor if you are experiencing any of above-mentioned side effects.